Amazon Drops Marijuana Testing for Employees, Supports Legalization



Amazon announced that it supports nationwide cannabis legalization and will no longer test most job applicants for marijuana use.

“We will no longer include marijuana in our comprehensive drug screening program for any positions not regulated by the Department of Transportation, and will instead treat it the same as alcohol use. We will continue to do impairment checks on the job and will test for all drugs and alcohol after any incident,” the company said in a blog post.

Additionally, the company said they would actively lobby Congress to pass the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act, which would legalize cannabis nationally.

“And because we know that this issue is bigger than Amazon, our public policy team will be actively supporting The Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement Act of 2021 (MORE Act)—federal legislation that would legalize marijuana at the federal level, expunge criminal records, and invest in impacted communities. We hope that other employers will join us, and that policymakers will act swiftly to pass this law,” according to Amazon’s blog.

Support for legalization and dropping drug testing for employees is a huge change for the second-largest private employer in the U.S. Prior to this announcement, the company disqualified people who tested positive for marijuana use from employment.

For example, in March, the company was sued by a man who said that the company reversed a hiring offer because of marijuana use—testing prospective employees for marijuana has been banned in New York City.

The Drug Policy Alliance expressed support in a statement in response to the policy change.

Drug testing has never provided an accurate indication of a person’s ability to perform their job, and yet this incredibly invasive practice has locked out millions of people who use drugs—both licit and illicit—from the workplace.”

However, the advocacy group urged Amazon to go further by ending all drug testing and supporting policies that promote equity for people of color.

“We implore Amazon and other employers to let this be the starting point and not the goal post. This change can and should be the catalyst to a much larger move—ending drug testing for all drugs—that would ensure a more just and equitable future for millions of people, especially Black, Brown and Indigenous communities who have been disproportionately impacted by these policies.”

Youth Marijuana Use Shows No Increase With Legalization



According to a federal study, states that have legalized adult-use marijuana have not seen an increase in either youth marijuana use or availability.

The U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) analyzed ten years of data from students in grades 9-12 who reported marijuana use in the previous 30 days. They found that between 2009 and 2019, youth marijuana use has remained essentially unchanged.

“The overall percentage of students who reported using marijuana at least 1 time during the previous 30 days in 2019 was not measurably different from the percentage in 2009…. There was no measurable difference between 2009 and 2019 in the percentage of students who reported that illegal drugs were made available to them on school property.”

The findings are consistent with prior data concerning youth marijuana use.

Despite the claim by cannabis opponents that marijuana use among teens would increase with legalization, the data tells a different story. In 2009, before the first recreational dispensaries opened, 21 percent of high school students reported cannabis use within the previous 30 days. In 2019, with recreational cannabis legal in 17 states, 22 percent of students reported recently using marijuana.

The percentage of high school students who use marijuana has remained consistent both before and after statewide cannabis legalization.

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) biennial Healthy Kids Colorado Survey found similar results.

“Youth marijuana use has not significantly changed since legalization, but the way youth are using marijuana is changing. In 2019, 20.6% of youth said they use marijuana compared to 19.4% in 2017. More youth are now vaping marijuana — 10.6% in 2019 compared to 5.1% in 2015. Dabbing rose from 4.3% in 2015 to 20.4% in 2019,” according to a press release.

A study published in JAMA Pediatrics found that teen marijuana use decreased after legalization. Researchers analyzed data from 1.4 million high school students between 1993 and 2017 and found an 8 percent decrease in teen use after states legalized recreational marijuana.

“Consistent with the results of previous researchers, there was no evidence that the legalization of medical marijuana encourages marijuana use among youth. Moreover, the estimates reported…showed that marijuana use among youth may actually decline after legalization for recreational purposes.”

Colorado Lawmakers Want to Reduce Access to Medical Marijuana Concentrates



Colorado’s Speaker of the House, Alec Garnett (D-Denver), has introduced legislation that would create more stringent rules for medical marijuana patients and marijuana concentrates.

 House Bill 1317 would require a review of a patient’s mental health history before a physician could recommend medical marijuana. That recommendation would have to include a prescribed THC potency level and daily dosage.

Additionally, a new state tracking system would monitor medical marijuana patient’s purchases.

Instead of being packaged and sold by the gram, marijuana concentrates, aka dabs, would be packaged in single doses no larger than 0.1 grams. Medical purchases of cannabis concentrates would be limited to 8 grams per day for patients 21 years and older. Medical marijuana patients between the ages of 18 and 20 would be limited to purchasing 2 grams of concentrate per day.

It’s not clear what data is driving the lawmaker’s desire to regulate marijuana concentrates and medical cannabis further. There has been an uptick in marijuana concentrate usage among teenagers from 2017 to 2019, but overall, marijuana usage rates in Colorado have remained flat in Colorado since legalization. Additionally, enrollment for Colorado’s medical marijuana program has fallen in recent years. It’s uncertain what impact the new legislation would have on patient access or the medical marijuana program as a whole.

“We have been at the table for months to produce a balanced policy measure, and we very much appreciate that the conversation has shifted to a more evidence-based approach to cannabis regulation,” according to a joint statement from the Marijuana Industry Group and Colorado Leads. “The cannabis industry has always supported youth prevention efforts and strict regulations that keep marijuana out of the hands of teenagers. That’s why we support an even more robust tracking system that limits the amount of medical marijuana concentrate 18- to 20-year-olds can purchase, as well as other provisions that make it harder for teenagers to obtain marijuana illegally.”

The new state system proposed under HB 1317 tracking the purchasing data of medical marijuana patients has raised both privacy concerns and fears about how that data could be used against minority communities.

Hashim Coats, executive director of Black Brown and Red Badged, a coalition of Black and Brown cannabis business owners, told Westword:

“The current draft legislation has serious racial bias implications and racial blind spots, particularly in the areas that address data collection and research,” he says. “We are supportive of some important provisions of this bill, [but] we are unfortunately still incredibly concerned about the racial tone-deafness and exclusion of Black voices from the discussion, which any legislation of this nature should include, and that the bill at this point has yet to strike the right balance.”

HB 1317 will have its first hearing in the House Public & Behavioral Health & Human Services Committee on May 18.

Mountain High Suckers Ranked Among Best CBD Lollipops



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Check out some of our recent reviews:

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Remedy Journey rated both our Mountain High Select CBD lollipops and our THC & CBD-infused Mountain High Suckers as having the best flavor selection of any cannabis-infused lollipop.

Mountain High Select is “one of the oldest names in the cannabis industry. The team believes in keeping everything simple yet powerful and effective,” said Ask Growers. “What’s more special is that the products come in a wide range of flavors, aromas, and uniquely crafted delicacies. The experienced users love indulging and stocking up on most of the products from this brand.”

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No Big 420 Events, but Cannabis Fans Can Still Celebrate in 2021



Well, it was another pandemic 4/20. While the smoke-outs and festivals were, for the most part, put on hold again this year, that doesn’t mean that there isn’t a lot to celebrate in cannabis. Here’s a roundup of some of the marijuana-related news that we’re looking forward to:

Marijuana Banking

If it seems like the marijuana industry has been trying to get access to banking for forever, well, you’re not wrong.

Although states continue to legalize marijuana at a steady clip, federal law prevents banks from doing business with the cannabis industry.

The American Bankers Association has been lobbying in support of the SAFE Banking Act, legislation that was introduced last year.

“Banks find themselves in a difficult situation due to the conflict between state and federal law, with local communities encouraging them to bank cannabis businesses and federal law prohibiting it,” the group wrote in a letter to lawmakers. “Congress must act to resolve this conflict.”

This week the U.S. House of Representatives passed legislation that would allow banks to open their doors to cannabis companies in legal states. The SAFE Banking Act passed the House in a 321-101 vote.

Despite a false start in 2019, there’s hope that the bill has a real chance of passing in the Senate with this new Congress. However, some Democrats favor bypassing piecemeal legislation and going for comprehensive change—nationwide cannabis legalization.

The Push for Nationwide Marijuana Legalization

While there’s already legislation that would remove marijuana from the list of Controlled Substances—including the MORE and STATES Acts—Democrats are planning on unveiling legislation that is a “unified discussion draft on comprehensive reform to ensure restorative justice, protect public health and implement responsible taxes and regulations.”

Senators Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Cory Booker (D-NJ) are the lead authors of the legislation, which Democrats promise will be introduced any day now.

While we don’t have many details beyond the bill legalizing marijuana nationwide, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) has said that the legislation will address social equity, banking protections, and prioritization for small businesses.

Sixteen states plus the District of Columbia have legalized adult-use marijuana, making cannabis consumption legal for more than a third of Americans. As cannabis is legalized state-by-state, it’s a matter of “when” not “if” marijuana will be legalized in the United States.

Denver Weed Delivery

Sometimes it’s the little things that make all the difference. While states like California have had marijuana delivery since state legalization, it’s been a long time coming in Colorado. Although the state green-lit cannabis delivery in 2019, municipalities have been slow to opt-in.

However, that’s all about to change in Denver this summer. This week, the Denver City Council unanimously approved a bill to allow dispensaries to hire third-party vendors to deliver weed to Denverites. The bill also removes Denver’s 220-store recreational marijuana dispensary cap. Any new cannabis dispensaries or marijuana delivery services will have to meet the state’s social equity criteria.

Mayor Michael Hancock (D) is expected to sign the bill, and cannabis delivery in Denver could start by late summer.

New York Governor Signs Cannabis Legislation Legalizing Marijuana



New York state has legalized adult-use marijuana, becoming the 15th state in the country to end cannabis prohibition.

In addition to legalizing recreational cannabis, the legislation that Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) signed into law last Wednesday will expunge the records of people with a previous marijuana conviction.

“This is a historic day in New York — one that rights the wrongs of the past by putting an end to harsh prison sentences, embraces an industry that will grow the Empire State’s economy, and prioritizes marginalized communities so those that have suffered the most will be the first to reap the benefits,” Cuomo said in a statement. “I’m proud these comprehensive reforms address and balance the social equity, safety and economic impacts of legal adult-use cannabis.”

Keep in mind that marijuana sales won’t start immediately, as the state needs time to establish a regulatory framework. The first cannabis sales are expected to begin in 2022.

Under the new law, adults can possess up to 3 ounces of cannabis and 24 grams of concentrate and cultivate up to three mature and three immature cannabis plants. Social consumption sites and weed delivery will be permitted.

Tax revenue from recreational marijuana sales will go towards education, a community grants reinvestment fund, and a drug treatment and public education fund. The state estimates that legalizing marijuana will create 30,000 to 60,000 jobs in the state.

New York’s neighbor, New Jersey, legalized recreational marijuana earlier this year.

“We expect 2021 to be a record-breaking year for legislatures legalizing cannabis,” Steve Hawkins, executive director at the Marijuana Policy Project, said in a statement. “More than two-thirds of Americans believe it’s time to end prohibition and this move represents the latest example of elected officials joining the chorus of support for legalizing and regulating cannabis for adults.”

New Mexico’s Governor to call special session for marijuana legalization bill



The New Mexico Legislature ended their 60-day legislative session Saturday without hearing a bill to legalize marijuana. Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham (D) announced that she would call a special session on the issue before the end of March.

“We’re going to have a special session in a week or so. We’re going to get cannabis because I am not going to wait another year,” the Governor said. “We’re going to win it, and it’s going to have the social justice aspects that we know have to be in the package.”

HB 12 passed the state House of Representatives in February, and the Senate was scheduled to hear the legislation on their last full day in session. However, as the legislative session ended on Saturday, it was clear that the Senate didn’t have time to hear the bill.

In a joint statement issued by the bill’s sponsors, Reps. Javier Martínez (D-Albuquerque) and Andrea Romero (D-Santa Fe) supported the Governor’s announcement of a special session.

We need to legalize adult-use cannabis tonight or in a special session. It’s now up to the Senate to have a vote. House Bill 12 puts forward New Mexico’s best opportunity to establish a multi-million-dollar industry with a framework that prioritizes social justice and equal opportunity for our communities. The Governor has made a commitment to sign a bill that represents our shared principles, and we welcome any avenue to do so. New Mexico is ready.”

If the Senate passes HB 12, it will allow the sale of recreational cannabis to adults 21 and older starting in April 2022.

“I believe legalization will be one of the largest job-creation programs in state history, driving entrepreneurial opportunities statewide for decades to come,” Gov. Lujan Grisham said. “I look forward to continuing to work with lawmakers to get the job done right.”

If the Senate passes HB 12 during a special session, it will head back to the House for final changes before going to the Governor for her signature.

March Cannabis Roundup



Colorado Weed Delivery

While delivery is legal in Colorado for recreational and medical marijuana, fewer than a handful of municipalities have opted into the service.

The Colorado Legislature legalized marijuana delivery in 2019, with a staggered rollout for medical marijuana in 2020 and recreational marijuana in 2021. However, only Superior and Aurora have opted into recreational delivery, and Longmont and Boulder allow medical marijuana delivery.

The City of Denver is considering a proposal to opt in to weed delivery as well as loosening restrictions on cannabis consumption at licensed businesses.

However, a bill from House Representative Marc Snyder (D-El Paso) proposes changes to the marijuana delivery program that would add additional hurdles for marijuana businesses. If the bill were successfully passed, it would require a minimum number of days and hours of in-store operation—at least five days a week and five hours a day. The bill would also prohibit dispensaries from allowing customers to use pre-paid accounts.

The bill currently doesn’t have any co-sponsors.

 

Mexico Passes Bill to Legalize Marijuana

Mexico is one step closer to ending marijuana prohibition after lawmakers approved a bill that would legalize cannabis for recreational, medical, and scientific uses.

Mexico’s lower house, the Chamber of Deputies, approved the bill by a 316-to-129 vote. Next, the bill will head to the Senate, where it’s expected to pass before being sent to President Andrés Manuel López Obrador, who is likely to sign the legislation.

If marijuana is legalized in Mexico, it will enable adults 18 and older to purchase and possess up to 28 grams of marijuana and cultivate up to six plants. Small farmers and commercial growers could apply for a license to cultivate and sell marijuana.

 

Record employment in cannabis as the marijuana industry grows

According to the 2021 Leafly Jobs Report, the cannabis industry now supports more than 321,000 full-time jobs.

According to the report, there are “more legal cannabis workers than electrical engineers. There are more legal cannabis workers than EMTs and paramedics. There are more than twice as many legal cannabis workers as dentists.”

More than 77,000 jobs were added in 2020—a doubling of the previous year’s job growth–but the report states that diversity in cannabis is still an issue.

While Black Americans represent 13% of the population, only 1.2% to 1.7% of cannabis companies have Black ownership.

The pandemic has been hard on the U.S. economy and jobs. Outside of the cannabis industry, the economy shrank by 3.5%, and the unemployment rate almost doubled, leaving nearly 10 million Americans without work.

The pandemic has also affected marijuana sales. In 2020, Americans purchased $18.3 billion worth of cannabis products, a 71% increase over 2019.

Lawmakers, marijuana organizations urge Biden to issue marijuana pardons



Thirty-seven lawmakers signed a letter to President Joe Biden asking him to issue a general pardon for all federal, nonviolent marijuana offenses.

In the letter, Congressional Cannabis Caucus co-chairs Reps. Earl Blumenauer (D-OR) and Barbara Lee (D-CA) wrote that a mass pardon is a racial justice issue and “until the day that Congress sends you a marijuana reform bill to sign, you have a unique ability to lead on criminal justice reform and provide immediate relief to thousands of Americans.”

The lawmakers reminded Biden that past presidents have used the pardon power for marijuana offenses.

“This is not a partisan issue; every President since George H.W. Bush has exercised their pardoning power for cannabis offenses. There is legal and scholarly support for the use of a blanket pardon on the War on Drugs.”

Issuing pardons for federal cannabis charges would fulfill a promise that Biden made during a Democratic primary debate.

“During your campaign, you committed that you would “automatically expunge all past marijuana convictions for use and possession,” the letter states. “Therefore, we urge you to grant executive clemency for all nonviolent cannabis offenders. We look forward to working with you and the incoming Attorney General on quickly making this a reality.”

Marijuana reform and advocacy groups, including NORML, the Minority Cannabis Business Association, and the National Cannabis Industry Association, also reminded President Biden of his campaign promises in a letter sent on Presidents’ Day.

“President Biden, we urge you to clearly demonstrate your commitment to criminal justice reform by immediately issuing a general pardon to all former federal, nonviolent cannabis offenders in the U.S. In addition, all those who are federally incarcerated on nonviolent, cannabis-only offenses for activity now legal under state laws should be pardoned and their related sentences commuted.”

Without pardons, the harm done during the war on drugs continues to impact communities of color disproportionately, reform advocates say in the letter.

“Criminal histories related to cannabis can be particularly harmful for individuals, despite the change in laws in many states. Convictions can seriously limit job opportunities, housing, and educational options. Long after a person has gone through the legal system, the baggage of the war on marijuana continues to undermine that person’s life and diminish their prospects. It is past time for the harm to stop.”

Other signatories of the letter sent by lawmakers include House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler (D-NY), House Rules Committee Chairman James McGovern (D-MA), Small Business Committee Chairwoman Nydia Velázquez (D-NY), and Reps. Ed Perlmutter (D-CO), Luis Correa (D-CA), Ro Khanna (D-CA), Rashida Tlaib (D-MI), Ilhan Omar (D-MN), Ayanna Pressley (D-MA), and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).

Democrats move to legalize marijuana nationwide in 2021



Democrats announced earlier this month that they plan to introduce legislation to legalize cannabis federally.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Cory Booker (D-NJ), and Ron Wyden (D-Or) said that they would push not only to end marijuana prohibition but will also focus on social equity and restorative justice.

“The War on Drugs has been a war on people—particularly people of color. Ending the federal marijuana prohibition is necessary to right the wrongs of this failed war and end decades of harm inflicted on communities of color across the country. But that alone is not enough. As states continue to legalize marijuana, we must also enact measures that will lift up people who were unfairly targeted in the War on Drugs,” said Sens. Chuck Schumer, Cory Booker (D-NJ), and Ron Wyden (D-Or) in a joint statement.

The senators said that they expect to unveil the legislation “in the early part of this year” that is a “unified discussion draft on comprehensive reform to ensure restorative justice, protect public health and implement responsible taxes and regulations.”

Hearing from marijuana advocacy groups and stakeholders in the cannabis industry will be part of drafting the legislation. Last week, the senators held a virtual roundtable with representatives from NORML, Drug Policy Alliance (DPA), Veterans Cannabis Coalition, and Students from Sensible Drug Policy, as well as the National Cannabis Industry Association and the Minority Cannabis Business Association (MCBA).

“We are committed to working together to put forward and advance comprehensive cannabis reform legislation that will not only turn the page on this sad chapter in American history, but also undo the devastating consequences of these discriminatory policies. The Senate will make consideration of these reforms a priority,” the senators said.

In 2020, the House passed the MORE Act, which sought to deschedule cannabis, expunge marijuana convictions, and create reinvestment programs in communities most impacted by the war on drugs. Unfortunately, the bill never received a hearing in the Senate.

“Last year, we moved heaven and earth to get a bill passed through the House with key criminal justice and restorative justice provisions, but Mitch McConnell blocked consideration,” said Earl Blumenauer (D-Or) in a statement. “Now, new Senate leadership is prepared to pick up the mantle.”

Support for ending cannabis prohibition has come a long way since Colorado and Washington voted to legalize marijuana in their states in 2012. As of this year, 15 states plus the District of Columbia have legalized weed. According to a Gallup poll conducted last November, 68% of Americans support marijuana legalization.

Mountain High Suckers Coming Soon to Missouri and Oklahoma



The Wait is Almost Over, Mountain High Suckers Fans!

We’re extremely proud to announce that our broad spectrum cannabis infused suckers will be coming soon to medical marijuana dispensaries in Missouri in 10mg THC / 3mg CBD doses and in Oklahoma in both 10mg THC / 3mg CBD doses and 30mg THC / 10mg CBD doses!

Legalization – About These Markets

Missouri

In 2018, voters in Missouri were in favor of legalizing medical marijuana, passing Amendment 2 with 65 percent approval. It was a watershed moment for a state that had traditionally opposed marijuana use. The amendment to the state constitution allows doctors to prescribe medical cannabis for ten qualifying medical conditions and patients can cultivate up to six plants.

Medical marijuana sales are just starting to ramp up in Missouri. During the first week of 2021, the state saw the first sales of edible marijuana products. Plus, there’s the possibility that voters could weigh in on legal recreational marijuana as early as 2022.

Oklahoma

Oklahoma became the 30th state to legalize medical marijuana in 2018. Like Missouri, Oklahoma generally opposed marijuana legalization—in 2016 they joined Nebraska in an attempt to sue Colorado over legal weed. However, in 2018, public opinion had shifted enough that a medical marijuana initiative passed with a 57% to 43% margin.

In 2020, medical marijuana was booming in Oklahoma. Residents bought a record amount of medical marijuana, increasing tax collections by more than 25%. The Oklahoma Tax Commission received $9.8 million in state taxes in April.

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Slow rollout for medical marijuana in Missouri; state lawmaker pushes to legalize recreational marijuana



It has been a slow start for medical marijuana in Missouri. In 2018, voters approved Amendment 2, allowing doctors to prescribe medical cannabis for qualifying medical conditions.

Since then, not a whole lot has happened. 372 Missouri-based medical marijuana businesses have received licenses from the state, but only 43 have received approval to operate as of December 31 of last year. Twenty-two approvals have gone to retail medical marijuana dispensaries, while 13 approvals have been granted to cannabis cultivation centers. More than 700 potential marijuana businesses that didn’t receive licenses have active appeals.

In a bit of good news for medical marijuana patients in the state, edible marijuana products went on sale for the first time in Missouri during the first week of 2021. While production is expected to be slow until more cultivation centers and retail dispensaries are licensed, it’s still a step forward for medical cannabis in Missouri.

Another first for Missouri is the Republican state lawmaker who wants to legalize recreational marijuana.

We spend more time and more law enforcement resources going after marijuana smokers than all the other drugs combined,” said Rep. Shamed Dogan (R). “Ten percent of the arrest in the state of Missouri right now are from marijuana possession.”

Dogan hopes legalization will bring more revenue to the state and eliminate the black market.

“I think alcohol prohibition taught us that trying to prohibit something this way, the way we’ve gone about marijuana prohibition, it backfires,” Dogan said.

Dogan plans to introduce a constitutional amendment, House Joint Resolution 30, during the 2021 legislative session. If lawmakers approve the amendment, residents could vote on legal recreational marijuana as early as 2022.

Dogan’s legislation doesn’t directly address racial inequity, but he does support clearing previous marijuana convictions.

“And it automatically lets out of prison anybody that is still serving a prison term for marijuana-only offenses and then expunges from your record if you have a non-violent marijuana offense,” Dogan said. “If you are currently incarcerated [for more than] a marijuana offense, so if you have a marijuana offense, but you also committed a robbery, you don’t get out.

2020: Cannabis Year End Recap



Whether it was a year to remember or a year you wish you could forget, 2020 is coming to a close.

Here were some of the biggest stories in weed this year:

Five more states vote to legalize recreational, medical marijuana

While marijuana prohibition is still in effect at the federal level, voters in states across the country continue to push to legalize marijuana.

This November, four states voted to legalize adult-use marijuana, and two states legalized medical marijuana.

Arizona

In Arizona, voters passed Proposition 207, legalizing recreational marijuana for adults 21 years and older. Recreational sales are expected to begin in March 2021. Arizonans can grow up to six cannabis plants at home or no more than 12 plants in a house with more than one adult. Additionally, Arizonans with a prior marijuana conviction can petition to have the record expunged as of July 12, 2021.

New Jersey

Voters in the Garden State said ‘yes’ to Question 1, legalizing adult-use cannabis. Adults 21 and older will be able to purchase and possess legal cannabis, subject to rules and regulations that will be overseen by the state’s Cannabis Regulatory Commission, which already oversees New Jersey’s medical marijuana program.

Montana

Montana is so into legal weed that they voted on not one but two ballot measures to legalize recreational marijuana.

Initiative 190 legalized the sale and possession of up to an ounce of cannabis and the cultivation of up to four cannabis plants and four cannabis seedlings at home. Recreational marijuana sales will be subject to a 20% tax.

Constitutional Initiative 118 amended the state constitution to allow the Legislature to set the age for adults permitted to possess and consume marijuana to 21 years and older.

South Dakota

In South Dakota, voters went all in for legal cannabis, simultaneously legalizing medical and recreational marijuana.

Measure 26 to legalize medical marijuana passed with a whopping 69% of the vote. Amendment A passed with the approval of 52% of voters, allowing adults 21 and older to possess up to an ounce of cannabis. However, the new law doesn’t kick in until July 1, 2021, so for now, it’s still illegal to possess marijuana in South Dakota.

Mississippi

Mississippians approved Ballot Initiative 65 to legalize medical marijuana in their state. Residents will be able to apply for a medical marijuana card for 22 qualifying conditions, including cancer, chronic pain, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Each medical marijuana patient will be able to possess up to 2.5 ounces of medical cannabis per 14-day period.

After November’s election, 15 states plus the District of Columbia have legalized recreational cannabis, and 35 states have legalized medical marijuana.

Europe’s Highest Court Rules that CBD is Not a Narcotic

The future of the CBD market in Europe is set to expand with a ruling from the European Union’s (EU) highest court that CBD is not a narcotic. According to the ruling, CBD “does not appear to have any psychotropic effect or any harmful effect on human health.”

Before the ruling, many CBD products in the EU existed in the grey market that allowed cannabis to be sold for agricultural purposes.

The ruling comes as the result of a lawsuit in France against a company that makes CBD oil from whole hemp plants. Only the fiber and seeds of hemp plants containing less than 0.2% THC could be used commercially in France.

The EU court ruled that France’s law banning the use of whole plant hemp-derived CBD went against the EU’s law on the free movement of goods.

Marijuana Dispensaries Essential Businesses During COVID-19

In March, COVID-19 upended our lives and temporarily shuttered businesses across the country. Marijuana dispensaries were among the businesses deemed essential.

After stay-at-home orders were issued in Colorado, recreational marijuana dispensaries converted to online pre-orders and curbside pickup. While Gov. Jared Polis (D) said that recreational and medical marijuana dispensaries were “critical” retail businesses, the process wasn’t without hiccups.

In contradiction to the governor, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock (D) deemed recreational marijuana dispensaries and liquor stores non-essential. Several hours later, Denver officials walked back the decision after hordes of Denverites rushed to stores to stock up.

Pandemic marijuana sales consistently break records

Maybe people just needed a way to cope, or maybe they had more free time—whatever the reason, marijuana sales records broke records month-over-month this year.

Colorado dispensaries sold $192,175,937 worth of marijuana in May, about 11 percent higher than the previous sales record of $173.2 million set in August 2019. Colorado cannabis sales were up 29% from April and up 32% as compared to May 2019.

Adult-use marijuana sales amounted to $158,102,628 during June, the first time that more than $150 million worth of recreational cannabis had been sold during June.

Marijuana sales hit an all-time high in July at $226 million, and for the year, more than $1.63 billion in cannabis products have been sold in the state.

 

U.S. House of Representatives Votes to Legalize Marijuana



On December 4, the U.S. House of Representatives voted to end federal marijuana prohibition.

Under the Marijuana Opportunity, Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act, cannabis would be decriminalized and removed as a scheduled substance.

The MORE Act would expunge federal marijuana convictions and create a reinvestment program to support individuals most impacted by the War on Drugs. A 5% federal tax on cannabis would go toward services such as job training, legal aid, and literacy and health education programs.

Rep. Ed Blumenauer (D-OR), who has long advocated for marijuana legalization, said that the bill is “going to make a huge difference for people all across America as Congress starts to catch up to where the American public is.”

“There’s a whole range of things that the MORE Act fixes,” Blumenauer said. “But most important is it stops this failed war on drugs that is so unfair to Americans of color, particularly black and brown. It will stop the federal interference with research. It’ll allow this emerging market to thrive, make it possible for more people to participate and be able to get on with their lives.”

The bill passed by a vote of 228 to 164, with 222 Democrats, five Republicans, and one Independent voting in support.

At a press event following the bill’s passage, Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) said that this “really is a moment for racial justice. We know that this year has put inequality and systemic racism to the forefront of our attention, and there’s no better way to close out this year than to really begin to atone for the destructive policies brought on by the failed war on drugs.”

The House might be as far as legalizing marijuana goes for now, however. Mitch McConnell (R-KY), the Senate Majority Leader, is against ending cannabis prohibition. McConnell, also known as the Grim Reaper when it comes to killing legislation, is expected to block any marijuana bills from getting a vote in the Senate. Vice President-elect Kamala Harris (D-CA) is the lead sponsor of the Senate version of the bill.

Europe’s Highest Court Rules That CBD is Not a Narcotic



The EU’s highest court has ruled that CBD is not a narcotic because “it does not appear to have any psychotropic effect or any harmful effect on human health.”

The ruling comes as the result of a lawsuit in France against a company that makes CBD oil from whole hemp plants. In France, only the fiber and seeds of hemp plants containing less than 0.2% THC can be used commercially.

The EU court ruled that France’s law banning the use of whole plant hemp-derived CBD went against the EU’s law on the free movement of goods.

“The national court must assess available scientific data in order to make sure that the real risk to public health alleged does not appear to be based on purely hypothetical considerations,” the court ruled.

“A decision to prohibit the marketing of CBD, which indeed constitutes the most restrictive obstacle to trade in products lawfully manufactured and marketed in other [EU] member states, can be adopted only if that risk appears sufficiently established,” the court wrote.

While individual countries can ban the free movement of goods for things like narcotic drugs, the court’s ruling means that those rules don’t apply to CBD.

Plus, as the court cited in their ruling, France has not banned synthetic CBD, which has the same properties as plant-derived CBD—making the prohibition of plant-derived CBD inconsistent.

The court’s decision could potentially open up the legal CBD market in Europe. Many CBD products currently exist in the grey market under rules that allow cannabis to be sold for agricultural purposes. Regulations about cannabis edibles and CBD have been stalled and in limbo, but the court’s decision could reopen a pathway to selling CBD edibles as food in Europe.

“With today’s ruling, CBD companies can expect a clearer route to achieving compliance across the EU. The harmonization of cannabinoid regulations could finally become a reality,” wrote the UK-based Association for the Cannabinoid Industry.

 

2020 Marijuana election results



It was a historic night for marijuana legalization in the U.S. four states voted to legalize recreational marijuana, and two states legalized medical marijuana.

Arizona

Arizonans overwhelmingly voted to pass Proposition 207, legalizing adult-use marijuana. Adults 21 years and older can possess and consume up to one ounce of marijuana. Adults can grow six cannabis plants at home or no more than 12 plants in a house with more than one adult.

Arizona’s Department of Health Services will begin accepting applications for recreational dispensaries in January. It will begin issuing licenses within 60 days–so expect the first recreational sales to kick off in March.

Arizonans with a prior marijuana conviction can petition to have the record expunged as of July 12, 2021. Finally, a 16% excise tax will be added to recreational marijuana sales to fund public programs.

New Jersey

The Garden State will be cultivating a new crop thanks to voters who approved Question 1 on the ballot, legalizing recreational cannabis. Adults 21 and older will be able to purchase and possess legal cannabis, subject to rules and regulations that will be overseen by the state’s Cannabis Regulatory Commission, which already oversees New Jersey’s medical marijuana program. Recreational marijuana sales will be subject to a 6.625% sales tax.

In 2019, legislation that would have legalized adult-use cannabis in New Jersey was pulled from a vote in the state legislature after failing to secure enough support from lawmakers.

Montana

Montana had not one but two ballot measures to legalize recreational marijuana, both of which were approved by voters.

Initiative 190 legalized the sale and possession of up to an ounce of cannabis and the cultivation of up to four cannabis plants and four cannabis seedlings at home. Recreational marijuana sales will be subject to a 20% tax.

Constitutional Initiative 118 amended the state constitution to allow the Legislature to set the age for adults permitted to possess and consume marijuana to 21 years and older.

New Approach Montana, the group who backed both ballot measures, estimates that legal adult-use marijuana sales will generate $48 million in tax revenue for the state by 2025.

“Our research has always shown that a majority of Montanans support legalization, and now voters will have the opportunity to enact that policy, which will create jobs and generate new revenue for our state,” said Pepper Petersen, campaign spokesman for the group.

South Dakota

South Dakota is the first state where voters simultaneously approved legalizing both medical and recreational marijuana.

Voters passed Measure 26 legalizing medical marijuana for people with qualifying conditions with 69% of the vote.

Amendment A passed with the approval of 52% of voters, allowing adults 21 and older to possess up to an ounce of cannabis and allowing the cultivation of up to three marijuana plants. The South Dakota Department of Revenue will issue licenses for manufacturers, testing facilities, and retailers. Sales tax on recreational sales will be 15%.

Marijuana possession will remain illegal in South Dakota until July 1, 2021.

Mississippi

Mississippians have said ‘yes’ to medical marijuana by approving Ballot Initiative 65.

The Mississippi Department of Health is required to hammer out the rules and regulations for a medical marijuana program by July 1, 2021. Mississippians will be able to apply for a medical marijuana card for 22 qualifying conditions, including cancer, chronic pain, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Each medical marijuana patient will be allowed to possess up to 2.5 ounces of cannabis per 14-day period. Home cultivation of marijuana is prohibited.

 

Michigan Governor Signs Cannabis Clean Slate Legislation



On October 12, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D) signed the “Clean Slate” legislation to expand expungement for marijuana convictions in the state. The legislation is a series of seven bills to broaden the criteria for expungements related to not only marijuana but also traffic offenses and other minor crimes.

“This is bigger than criminal justice reform,” Lt. Gov. Garlin Gilchrist said. “This is about economic opportunity and full participation in our economy and our society.”

Michiganders convicted of misdemeanor marijuana offenses that would have been legal after cannabis was legalized in the state in 2018 can apply to have their convictions erased. Prosecutors will have 60 days to dispute the claim. If prosecutors don’t make a rebuttal, the marijuana conviction will be expunged.

Misdemeanors and felonies not related to marijuana will be cleared with an automatic expungement process.

“During my 2018 campaign for governor, I made expungement of marijuana charges one of my key priorities, and I’m so proud today that we can follow through on that goal,” Whitmer said at a press conference. “For too long, criminal charges have created barriers to employment, barriers to housing, and others for hundreds of thousands of Michiganders. These bipartisan bills are going to be a game-changer.”

Michigan will automatically clear misdemeanors seven years after sentencing. Felonies will be removed ten years after sentencing or the person’s release from incarceration, whichever was last. Up to two felonies and four misdemeanors can be automatically cleared.

“You’re in your community, you’re invested in your community, you’re spending time with your family, you’re working, you’re accessing housing,” said State Rep. Graham Filler (Dewitt-R). “We have less recidivism, less victims. This is what happens when you access expungement.”

The laws are set to take effect in April 2021.

Colorado Gov. to Issue Mass Pardon for Marijuana Convictions



On October 1, Colorado Gov. Jared Polis pardoned 2,732 low-level marijuana possession convictions through an executive order. The pardon only applies to convictions prosecuted in state courts through 2012 for possession of up to one ounce of cannabis. The pardon does not apply to marijuana convictions in municipal courts or other states.

“This really catches Coloradans up with where the law is today,” Polis told The Denver Post.

Notably, Gov. Polis had the option to pardon anyone with a marijuana conviction for possession of two ounces or less. Still, he opted to issue pardons for cases involving convictions of one ounce or less. House Bill 1424, passed in June, gave the governor the power to pardon marijuana convictions.

“It’s off their records. If they have a background check at work or want a concealed-weapons permit or a student loan, this will no longer hold anybody back,” Polis told Westword. “And it’s also symbolically important, because it shows that as a state and nation, we’re coming to terms with the incorrect discriminatory laws of the past that penalized people for possession of small amounts of marijuana.”

There is no need to apply for the pardon. The Colorado Bureau of Investigation combed through the Colorado criminal-history database to find convictions eligible for the pardon.

“The convictions were then reviewed to make sure they occurred in state court, and then eligible convictions were identified based on the conviction data. We were able to then proactively pardon all 2,732 convictions at the same time,” Polis said. The state has set up a website for anyone who wants to check if their conviction was pardoned: comarijuanapardons.com

Rep. James Coleman (D-Denver), one of the sponsors of HB 1424, plans on going further by expunging marijuana convictions and expanding social equity opportunities in the cannabis industry.

“Whether it’s one or a thousand (people), my focus is to figure out by the time I’m done in the legislature how we not only pardon these individuals but figure out how to expunge it off their records,” Coleman said.

Colorado was the first state to legalize recreational marijuana in 2012; however, the state has been slower than other legal cannabis states to pardon or expunge low-level marijuana convictions. Nevada has pardoned more than 15,000 cannabis convictions, while California has an automatic expungement process for certain convictions. Illinois and Massachusetts included a marijuana expungement process in their legislation legalizing marijuana.

While there are programs in Denver and Boulder to expunge marijuana convictions, they haven’t been very successful. In Denver, during the first six months of the expungement program, fewer than 1 percent of the 13,000 people eligible had their marijuana convictions erased.

September Cannabis Roundup



Researchers Study Whether Cows Fed Hemp Will Get Meat Eaters and Milk Drinkers High

Will feeding hemp to cattle pass along a high to humans? That’s what researchers at Kansas State University hope to discover after the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) awarded them a $200,000 grant.

Although the federal government legalized hemp under the 2018 Farm Bill, it’s prohibited for use as animal feed, and no one really knows what effect cannabinoids have on cattle. Plus, using hemp as livestock feed could potentially result in concentrations of THC in meat and milk.

“Our goal is to fill in the knowledge gaps,” said Michael Kleinhenz, one of the researchers at Kansas State University. “Until feedstuffs containing hemp are established as safe in animals, our data will assist producers in managing situations involving intentional or unintentional hemp exposures.”

Fewer Vaping Illnesses Reported in Legal Marijuana States

According to a study conducted by the Yale School of Public Health, higher rates of e-cigarette and marijuana vaping did not result in more vaping-related lung injuries (known as EVALI) in states with legalized marijuana.

“Indeed, the five earliest states to legalize recreational marijuana—Alaska, California, Colorado, Oregon and Washington—all had less than one EVALI case per 100,000 residents aged 12 to 64. None of the highest EVALI-prevalence states—Utah, North Dakota, Minnesota, Delaware and Indiana—allowed recreational marijuana use,” according to Yale researchers.

So what accounts for the difference? It turns out that the use of Vitamin E acetate, a vaping additive used to dilute marijuana oils in mostly black-market vaping products, is responsible for the rise in EVALI cases. People in states where marijuana is still prohibited are more likely to seek out black-market products.

Yale researchers used data collected by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) related to EVALI hospitalization and deaths nationwide.

Another Month, Another Colorado Marijuana Sales Record

Marijuana sales in Colorado have been breaking records nearly every month, despite (or maybe because of) the COVID-19 pandemic. July was no exception: Recreational marijuana dispensary sales amounted to $183,106,003, while medical marijuana sales amounted to $43,268,565. Combined, that’s $226,374,568 worth of weed, up 13.8% from June.

So far, Colorado dispensaries have sold more than $1.2 billion worth of marijuana edibles, concentrate, and flower in 2020, amounting to $203 million in taxes for the state.

If cannabis sales continue to break records, 2020 could surpass 2019’s record of $1.75 billion in annual sales.

August Cannabis Roundup



Pennsylvania governor calls for marijuana legalization to help boost state economy

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf is urging state legislators to legalize adult-use marijuana. During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, shutdowns have hurt the state economy.

The move to legalize recreational marijuana could boost revenue for the state, which in turn would fund grants for small businesses and restorative justice programs. Fifty percent of the funding for small businesses would be reserved for historically disadvantaged businesses.

Some of the tax revenue would go toward “restorative justice programs that give priority to repairing the harm done to crime victims and communities as a result of marijuana criminalization.”

It’s uncertain if the proposal would pass the Republican-majority General Assembly. House Majority Leader Kerry Benninghoff (R), called Wolf “disingenuous” by proposing “an unaffordable legislative agenda.”

Medical marijuana has been legal in Pennsylvania since 2016, and the first medical marijuana dispensaries opened in 2018.

Adult-use cannabis on Montana ballot in November

Two ballot measures aimed at legalizing recreational marijuana will be on the ballot in Montana this November.

Initiative 190 would legalize the sale and possession of up to an ounce of cannabis, as well as the cultivation of up to four cannabis plants and four cannabis seedlings at home. The initiative calls for a twenty percent tax on adult-use marijuana sales.

Constitutional Initiative 118 would amend the state constitution to allow the Legislature to set the age for adults permitted to possess and consume marijuana—which would likely be 21, the same age for legally purchasing alcohol.

New Approach Montana, the group who backed both ballot measures, estimates that legal adult-use marijuana sales will generate $48 million in tax revenue for the state by 2025.

“Our research has always shown that a majority of Montanans support legalization, and now voters will have the opportunity to enact that policy, which will create jobs and generate new revenue for our state,” said Pepper Petersen, campaign spokesman for the group.

Colorado recreational cannabis sales break record, again

Recreational marijuana sales continue to break records during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Adult-use marijuana sales amounted to $158,102,628 during June, according to data from the Department of Revenue’s Marijuana Enforcement Division. That’s a 6 percent increase from the last single-month recreational sales record, and the first time that more than $150 million worth of recreational cannabis has been sold during the month of June.

The state collected $33.62 million in taxes from cannabis sales in June. Tax reporting for July, which comes out before sales data, shows the state collected $36.13 million in taxes. So far, in 2020, Colorado has collected $203.3 million in cannabis tax revenue.

Mountain High Suckers talks with CannabisTech.com



John Garrison, Mountain High Suckers’ co-founder and CEO, sat down with Genifer Murray of CannabisTech.com to talk about Mountain High Suckers’ history in cannabis and the secret to their success and longevity in the industry. Here are some highlights:

Forming partnerships across industries

Mountain High Suckers has formed partnerships both within and outside of the cannabis community over the years. Together with Groundswell and DJ Logic, they created an exclusive strain, Logic Diesel, and infused it into a sucker to create Logic Pops. Mountain High Suckers teamed up with comedian Josh Blue to create a line of suckers called Josh Blue’s Dream. Their most recent partnership with cyclist Floyd Landis brought them from the sweet to savory realm with a line of THC and CBD-infused sauces and spreads.

Why the 3:1 THC to CBD ratio?

“We came up with that ratio just out of trying not to put too much CBD in because no one knew what CBD was when we started doing this. So we came up with this formula, three-to-one, and over the years we have literally maybe a hundred testimonials of people calling up either crying or with an incredible story that his three-to-one ratio made all the difference in their lives, so we stuck with it and we still have it today.”

Which extraction process does Mountain High Suckers use?

“You get a lot more volume of extract [with butane], and it comes out cleaner. It’s more for smoking…where our stuff is not smokeable, it’s more like a Rick Simpson oil. [With ethanol] we leave some chlorophyll in there. We leave a little bit of wax in there. We try to leave as many cannabinoids as possible instead of stripping it down to where you have nothing left, and then you try to add in all the terpenes back in to come up with your beautiful smell to the product. But for medicinal purposes and all-around health benefits, everything about alcohol extraction is just a better product to have for edibles.”

How have John and Chad maintained a successful company and partnership together?

“I think a lot of it has to do with our background in rock climbing together. We were continuously watching out for each other’s lives. So, you know, when it moved into the business setting, which we had a painting company together, it was similar. We always watched out for each other. We could speak for each other.

We’ve known each other for 24 years, and I think communication is everything. We preach communication to all of our business partners. You don’t communicate, and I’m not going to do business with you. You know, it’s key to every single thing there is.

The other thing is we strive for the same things in our lives. We both are committed to recreation, so we don’t let our edibles company rule our lives. We still get out a lot. We cycle, hike, you know everything that we want to do, and we still manage to put a lot of hours into this business.”

I think the other thing that helps our company is that we’re not invested in by anybody else. It’s our own money, so we don’t have a board. It’s Chad and I at the table. If you want to do business, you talk to Chad and I.”

Where can you buy Mountain High Suckers, and what are your plans for future expansion?

“Right now, we’re in Colorado. We’ve been in Puerto Rico for about a year and a half. We’re signing a deal with Oklahoma, and then we have California on the back burner and New Mexico and Oregon.

“We are talking with some Canadians now and have been for quite a while. No deals go through quickly, and if they do, they probably aren’t a good thing.

Chad’s wife is from Thailand, so they were in Thailand last year, and they went to a cannabis convention. So we’re working on some international stuff.

We have a new CBD company that we just started called Mountain High Select. They’re available around the nation. That’s a CBD, CBG infused sucker.

Chad and I have been doing this for eleven years, so I’m not going to lie, I’m getting a little tired. We’re looking for an exit plan down the road. I think everybody is who has been in it this long. We’re still excited every day to come to work. We love our jobs, and we have great employees. We love what we do.”

What advice would you give someone just starting in the industry?

“Make sure that whatever you’re doing is a very wanted product, whether it’s a media product or it’s a live product, kind of cannabis grow, whatever you do, but don’t jump in without knowing. Get lawyers. One-hundred percent you’ve got to have lawyers.

The other thing is if people approach you and they want to invest, you have to vet them. You have to hang out. You have to go to lunch with them. You have to realize that if you do a deal, then you’re going to be working with them for three to five years. That’s a long time, so you want to be able to have them come over to your house for dinner. You have to really like the people that you work with. Even if there are problems. If you communicate, you can get through everything.”

Thanks to Genifer Murray and CannabisTech.com for a great conversation. See the full video here:

Colorado Marijuana Sales Break all Records in May



$192,175,937 worth of marijuana products were sold in May, according to the Department of Revenue’s Marijuana Enforcement Division. That’s about 11 percent higher than the previous sales record of $173.2 million that was set in August 2019.

Colorado cannabis sales were up 29% from April, and up 32% as compared to May 2019.

May medical marijuana sales amounted to $42,989,322, and recreational cannabis sales amounted to $149,186,615. Altogether, that amounts to more than $779 million in cannabis sold so far in 2020, equaling more than $167 million in state tax revenue.

So why were sales up so much during May? Roy Bingham, co-founder and executive chairman of BDS Analytics, said that people are spending more time at home, which may mean that they’re simply consuming more cannabis.

Everyone has perhaps become more used to consuming a little more,” Bingham said.

Plus, Coloradoans are buying more cannabis when they visit a dispensary, stocking up rather than making more frequent trips—a trend that started when Gov. Polis issued the stay-at-home order in March.

“It’s beginning to look like cannabis is anti-recession, or at least COVID-recession resistant,” Bingham said, adding Colorado has experienced “spectacular growth” this year.

State projections released in May predicted that marijuana tax revenue would decrease this year because of less tourism, more unemployment, and loss of wages from COVID-19. That hasn’t been the case so far in 2020, and sales numbers could increase during August, traditionally the biggest marijuana sales month of the year.

Colorado isn’t the only legal marijuana state that’s seen a jump in sales. Oregon cannabis sales are up nearly 60 percent from May 2019, surpassing $100 million for the first time since the legal sales began in 2015.

In Washington, sales are up nearly three times the rate in 2019, and up 8 percent compared to 2018.

 

New Law Allows Colorado Governor to Pardon Marijuana Convictions



Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed a bill into law that will allow him to pardon marijuana convictions that occurred before the state legalized marijuana in 2012.

>House Bill 1424, passed by lawmakers on June 15, is aimed at increasing social equity in the cannabis industry. The bill allows Colorado residents who have been arrested or convicted of a marijuana offense, been subject to civil asset forfeiture related to a marijuana offense, or applicants living in economically disadvantaged areas toFor decades now, the Black community has been disproportionately criminalized because of marijuana while others have profited,” state Rep. James Coleman (D-Denver), one of the bill’s sponsors, toldThe Denver Post, “We have needed to act on this injustice for decades.”

A last-minute amendment to the bill gave the governor the ability to issue mass pardons for marijuana convictions of 2 ounces or less without approval from judges or district attorneys.

“There’s too many people that have a prior conviction for personal amounts of cannabis fully legal today that prevent them from getting loans, from getting leases, from raising capital, from getting licenses, from getting jobs, from getting mortgages, and that’s wrong,” Polis said during the bill signing. “We hope that this measure will be a first step for new opportunities for thousands of Coloradans who should not be living with a cloud over their head simply because they were a little bit ahead of their time.”

While the governor will have the ability to issue a mass pardon, the process isn’t automatic. People with marijuana convictions will still have to apply to clear their records.

While the new law is a step towards social equity in the cannabis industry, the Black Cannabis Equity Initiative and the Colorado Black Round Table urged Polis in a letter to immediately release low-level cannabis offenders and expunge their records.

This Pardon and Expungement are not the face of social equity in Colorado, however, they are important action steps in recognizing and acknowledging systemic and institutional racism as well as the past barriers and significant omissions in the evolution and history of the Colorado cannabis industry.”

The law will take effect in 90 days.

Our Broad Spectrum Hemp (CBD) Suckers: Shipping to You!



We had a hiccup with our payment processing, unfortunately still a problem in 2020, but our brand new broad spectrum hemp infused (CBD +more) suckers are back online and ready to be shipped to you!

These tasty products are hand made in Denver Colorado, USA from mostly non-GMO, organic, and Kosher ingredients and are available wherever CBD is legal.

Now for sale in the following flavors:

Blueberry

Our lusciously fruity broad spectrum hemp infused blueberry sucker will mellow you out with the flavor of sweetened, summer-ripe blueberries.

Watermelon

Our fabulously fresh broad spectrum hemp infused watermelon sucker will tantalize your taste buds with the flavor of sweet, summer-ripe watermelon.

Strawberry Banana (Straw-nana)

A lively combination of our sweet-tart strawberry sucker topped with pieces of banana and strawberry for multilayered fruit flavor. Stra-nana your way into a sweet high with our infused Strawberry Banana sucker.

Sour Lemon

Our sour lemon broad spectrum hemp infused sucker is tart and sour-sweet. Bright and bursting with the zesty flavor of sun-warmed citrus, this lightly medicated sweet will help you mellow out and unwind.

Grape

With a classically delicious fruity grape flavor, this broad spectrum hemp infused sucker is a royal plum purple treat. Be king or queen of the castle with these OG fan favorite grape suckers.

Tangerine

Add a little sunshine to your day with our refreshingly sweet and tangy citrus broad spectrum hemp infused tangerine sucker.

Why Buy From Mountain High?

Our infusion process allows for dual absorption, which means it’s absorbed through both your mouth (sublingual) and in your liver (gastrointestinal) for a more complete effect.

This product is also unique in that it offers a variety of the known cannabinoids rather than just CBD alone!

At Mountain High Select, our goal is to produce high quality infused products. We test every batch of oil to ensure accurate dosage. We proudly provide testing and Certificates of Analysis for all of our products.

Finally you can get your favorite infused lollipops delivered to your door from MountainHighSelect.com!

Marijuana Sales During Coronavirus Pandemic Uneven in Legal States



Cannabis sales during coronavirus shutdowns haven’t been the same in every state, with newer cannabis markets seeming to fair better than established markets that depend on tourism.

Despite a statewide stay-at-home order issued on March 23, Washington state saw record-breaking cannabis sales in April. Recreational marijuana sales increased 20% compared to April 2019, generating $106 million. Adult-use cannabis sales in Washington during March amounted to $99 million.

According to Marijuana Business Daily, Washington is a good test state to see if cannabis is “recession-proof” because it has a relatively mature market that generates a higher portion of sales from locals.

States like Colorado generate a higher amount of cannabis sales from tourists, so even with the leveling off of sales in the state in recent years, Colorado should expect to see a dip in cannabis revenue.

“Estimates prepared for the Department of Revenue suggest that tourists accounted for 7 to 9 percent of marijuana consumption in Colorado between 2014 and 2017,” according to a state budgeting report.

Adult-use cannabis sales in Colorado during April 2020 generated $91 million, a 16% decrease as compared to the same time in 2019

While California saw a modest gain in cannabis sales in April, monthly sales growth was less than before the pandemic. In March, Californians bought $276 million in recreational cannabis, an increase of 53% compared to March 2019. In April, sales equaled $248 million, an increase of only 17%.

With travel all but grounded during the pandemic, Nevada’s cannabis businesses have been hit hard by the lack of tourism. Adult-use cannabis sales fell 26% in the state, earning $38 million in sales in April, down from $54 million in March. According to Will Adler, Director of the Sierra Cannabis Coalition, 80% of recreational and medical marijuana sales in Nevada are generated from tourists.

Illinois’ adult-use cannabis market launched in January, with a record-setting $39.2 million in sales. April’s adult-use marijuana sales didn’t top January’s numbers, but they were still higher than average. In April, Illinois sold nearly $37.3 million in recreational cannabis, $2.6 million more than was sold in March.

In Oklahoma, residents bought a record amount of medical marijuana, increasing tax collections by more than 25%. The Oklahoma Tax Commission received $9.8 million in state taxes in April. By comparison, the state generated $7.8 million in medical marijuana tax revenue in March. According to The Oklahoman, medical marijuana dispensaries sold $61.4 million worth of medical cannabis in April or nearly $217 per licensed patient.

Bud Scott, executive director of the Oklahoma Cannabis Industry Association, credits people staying home with the increase in medical marijuana sales.

“With the stay-home order in place, and medical marijuana dispensaries being categorized as essential health services, Oklahoma patients were afforded the ability to take their medicine on a more regular basis and sample a broader range of available medicines,” Scott said.

Cannabis users looking for relief from stress and anxiety could account for increases in marijuana sales that don’t rely on tourism.

“I’ve probably medicated more these past few months. You’ve got people staying home and getting stimulus checks, and what are they spending it on? Things that help keep them calm and collected,” Keith Wiley, owner of Native Brothers Dispensary, told The Oklahoman.